Let's Talk 2e! Virtual Conference

2018 Online Conference for Parents, Educators, and Clinicians

(formerly known as 2 Days of 2e)

About the 2018 conference

Parents, educators, and clinicians, join us to learn all about reaching and teaching 2e learners (gifted with a learning difference). Twelve renowned experts and thought leaders discuss topics from emotion regulation, social thinking, and trauma to learning styles, classroom regulation, and teaching strategies. Participants learn how to use research-based tools for their home, classroom or clinical office. Contact hours are available through the University of Connecticut.

  • Strategies for Home and Classroom — Julie Skolnick, M.A., J.D.
  • Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses — Ed Amend, Psy.D.
  • Gifted and 2e Identification — Stephen Chou, Psy.D.
  • Strength-Based & Talent-Focused Approach — Susan Baum, Ph.D., Robin Schader, Ph.D
  • Anxiety — Dan Peters, Ph.D.
  • Perfectionism — Lisa Van Gemert, M.Ed.T.
  • Underachievement — Donna Y. Ford, Ph.D.
  • Schoolwide Enrichment & Talent Development — Joe Renzulli, Ed.D., Sally Reis, Ph.D.
  • Academic Advocacy — Bobbie Gilman, M.S.
  • Inspirational Closing Keynote — Jonathan Mooney

Meet our experts & learn about their presentations.

Learn all about reaching and teaching twice-exceptional and gifted children from these expert presentations.

Julie Skolnick, M.A., J.D.

Opening Keynote: Cycle for Success: Parenting and Teaching 2e

In this session you will learn about Julie Skolnick’s Cycle for Success in Parenting and Teaching 2e kids. Understanding the gifted and 2e experience is the essential first-step to developing durable strategies and advocacy skills. Learn about the Columbus Group definition of giftedness, in particular characteristics of asynchronous development, perfectionism and intensity. After discussing these characteristics, you will study Julie’s trademarked acronym P-R-A-I-S-E™, a concept representing six categories of strategies that are particularly impactful with 2e kids. Julie’s energy, humor and deep passion for the 2e profile come through as she shares anecdotal examples and a glimpse into the 2e child’s and student’s life.

Julie Skolnick, M.A., J.D., Founder of With Understanding Comes Calm, LLC, passionately guides parents of gifted and distractible children, mentors 2e adults, trains educators and advises professionals on how to bring out the best and raise self-esteem in their 2e students and clients.

Julie serves as Secretary to the Maryland Superintendent’s Gifted and Talented Advisory Council, is the Maryland liaison for Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG), is a Committee member for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and serves as an advisor to “The G Word” feature documentary currently in production.

Julie produces Let’s Talk 2e! virtual conferences, hosts the Let’s Talk 2e! Membership Community, publishes “Gifted & Distractible” newsletter and a monthly blog.

A frequent speaker and prolific writer, Julie is also the mother of three twice exceptional children who keep her on her toes and uproariously laughing.

Subscribe to “Gifted & Distractible” monthly newsletter at www.WithUnderstandingComesCalm.com. Follow Julie on social media: Facebook.com/WithUnderstandingComesCalm, Instagram: @LetsTalk2e, Twitter: @JulieSkolnick, LinkedIn: Julie Rosenbaum Skolnick, and YouTube: Let’s Talk 2e

Jonathan Mooney

Closing Keynote: Normal Sucks

Welcome to a new world, where the good kid doesn’t sit still. A world where some of the smartest kids in the class don’t read well or don’t read at all. A world where the popular kids don’t make eye contact, don’t shake hands, and definitely don’t back slap.

In this world, these kids enjoy academic success and personal fulfillment at places like the MIT Media Lab and MET High School in Providence, Rhode Island, one of the top charter schools in the country. Then, they go on to run companies in Silicon Valley, New York and Tokyo.

Unlike ever before, this century proves their cognitive differences are more than “quirks” – they are the groundwork for innovative ideas and skills to solve problems most of us wouldn’t anticipate. Think Google. Jet Blue. Apple. By embracing the beautiful, bizarre realities of neuro-diversity – the idea that we are all special snowflakes – as essential components of a healthy vibrant culture, we can propel students not only to better participate in, but seize the changing world where the digital brain rivals the text-oriented and a design oriented economy replaces a manufacturing base. Renowned writer, neuro-diversity activist and author Jonathan Mooney vividly, humorously and passionately brings to life this wonderful world of neuro-diversity: the research behind it, the people who live in it, and the lessons it has for all of us who care about the future of education.

Explaining the latest theories, Jonathan helps teachers and parents redefine what it is for students in the 21st century to think and to learn and to be successful. He provides concrete examples of how to prepare students and implement frameworks that best support their academic and professional pursuits. In this lecture, Jonathan takes the audience to life in high schools organized around the principles of video gaming and visual culture. He transports the audience to snow-bound strip malls in Sweden where a software design company has decided to only hire people with Asperger’s syndrome—not as charity, but because this company believes programmers with Asperger’s make superior employees.

As with Jonathan’s other lectures, the audience will leave this talk fundamentally changed and empowered. “Re-drawing the lines” blends research and human interest stories with concrete tips that parents, students, teachers, and administrators can follow to transform learning environments and create a world that truly celebrates cognitive diversity.

Jonathan Mooney is a writer and learning activist who did not learn to read until he was 12 years old. He is a graduate of Brown University’s class of 2000 and holds an honors degree in English Literature. Jonathan has spent his entire professional career as a social entrepreneur developing organizations, programs, and initiatives to improve the lives of marginalized groups. In 1997, as an undergraduate at Brown University, Jonathan co-founded Project Eye-To-Eye, a non-profit advocacy organization for students with learning differences. As the founding president and Executive Director, Jonathan grew the organization from an undergraduate project conceived in his dorm room into a national organization, which currently has 38 chapters in 20 states working with over 10,000 parents, educators, and students. Jonathan has also worked extensively to create career and college pathways to move low-income youth and adults out of poverty creating the Los Angeles Energy pathway program; The Urban Teacher Fellowship; and the Promo Pathway, an initiative Vice President Al Gore called “a model for moving at-risk youth into the creative economy.”

With the publication of Learning Outside The Lines (now in its 18th printing) when he was 23, Jonathan has established himself as one of the foremost leaders in the neurodiversity and learning revolution. His second book, The Short Bus: A Journey Beyond Normal was published in the spring of 2007 to outstanding reviews in The New York Times Book ReviewThe Los Angeles TimesThe Chicago Tribune and many other national publications. Both books are considered foundational texts in the disability rights movement, the inclusive education movement, and the learning revolution and are used in undergraduate and graduate program at universities and colleges across the country including Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and Teachers College, Columbia University.

Jonathan’s work has been widely recognized for its innovation and social impact. In 1999, Jonathan was selected as a Harry S. Truman Scholar for Public Service. In 2000, Jonathan was selected as a finalist for the Rhodes Scholarship. In 2002, the LD Access Foundation recognized his work for students with disabilities with the Golden Advocacy award. Previous honorees include David Boies, Judith Rodin, former President of The University of Pennsylvania, and former New Jersey Governor Thomas H. Kean; and In 2008 Jonathan’s social impact work was recognized by the Lab School of Washington where he shared the stage with the Vice President of the United States, Joseph Biden.

Jonathan is a highly sought after speaker on neurodiversity, education reform, the learning revolution, and creating college and career pathways for at risk youth. He has lectured in 43 states and three countries. He has been featured and quoted in/on The New York TimesThe Los Angeles TimesThe Chicago TribuneUSA Today, HBO, NPR, ABC News, New York Magazine, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe.

Edward Amend, Psy.D.

Misdiagnosis and Missed Diagnosis of Gifted Individuals

Misdiagnosis of gifted individuals most frequently occurs when professionals mistakenly view specific social and emotional characteristics of gifted individuals as signs of pathology. Missed diagnosis occurs when factors of giftedness obscure weaknesses, or problematic behaviors are minimized because one is gifted. The presenter will discuss the most common disorders that lead to either misdiagnosis or missed diagnoses, explore the relationship between giftedness and clinical syndromes, and provide information and strategies for social and emotional development.

Edward R. Amend, Psy.D., (Amend rhymes with Raymond) is a practicing clinical psychologist at Amend Psychological Services, P.S.C., in Lexington, Kentucky. He is licensed in both Kentucky and Ohio. In his practice, Dr. Amend focuses on the social, emotional, and educational needs of gifted and talented youth, adults, and their families. He provides evaluations and therapy, facilitates child and parent discussion groups, and offers consultation and training for school personnel. Dr. Amend is co-author of two award-winning books: A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children and Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger’s, Depression, and Other Disorders (2nd edition). As a strong advocate for the gifted population, Dr. Amend’s years of service have included the Board of Directors of Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted; President of the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education; Chair for the National Association for Gifted Children Counseling and Guidance Network; and consultant to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development. He speaks locally and nationally on issues related to giftedness.

Stephen Chou, Psy.D.

Identification

Identification for twice-exceptional (2e) is oftentimes enigmatic. Of those who assess children, few are specifically trained to assess in the area of giftedness and twice-exceptionality/multi-exceptionality. Gifted and 2e children often have complex cognitive, academic, emotional, and behavioral profiles that are often misunderstood and misdiagnosed. Uncovering the gifted/2e child’s unique profile is critical for identification of the child’s strengths as well as areas of challenges such that the child is seen and understood.

Stephen H. Chou, Psy.D. is a supervising clinical psychologist in private practice in California and Colorado and the Director of Training and Research at the Summit Center within the San Francisco Bay/LA Area. Dr. Chou is also the Co-Founder/Director of 2e Assessment and Research at FlexSchool. Dr. Chou is a former Director with the Board of Directors with Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG). Dr. Chou is currently an adjunct professor with the University of Denver, and was an adjunct professor at Alliant International University – California School of Professional Psychology in San Francisco, CA and Hong Kong, a supervising clinical psychologist at the Chinatown Child Development Center through the Department of Public Health with the City and County of San Francisco, and the Executive Director of the Big Sibling Program. Dr. Chou practices from a developmental, strengths-based, and multicultural stance through individual and family counseling, as well as intellectual, educational, behavioral, emotional, and neuropsychological assessments, with children, families, and adults, especially with those who are gifted, talented, twice-exceptional (2e), and multiexceptional. Dr. Chou also presents at state, national, and international conferences on a variety of topics in giftedness.

Susan Baum, Ph.D. & Robin Shader Ph.D.

Strength-Based and Talent-Focused Approach

This presentation will provide a solid rationale for the power of learning in an environment in which uniqueness is honored and strengths lead the way. Discover strategies to find, share, leverage, and develop interests, gifts, and talents. With just a shift in focus, you can find practical ideas for being a change agent in your home, classroom, and school.

Susan Baum, Ph.D. is the Director of the 2e Center for Research and Professional Development at Bridges Academy, a school for twice exceptional. She is the 2010 recipient of the Life Time Achievement Award granted by the Weinfeld Group, for her contributions to the field of the education of twice exceptional learners, 2011 recipient of the Connecticut Association for Gifted’s Friend of the Gifted Award and the 2015 Distinguish Professional Alumni Award from the Neag School of Education for her work with twice exceptional students and the Lifetime Achievement Award from AEGUS and the 2e Newsletter in 2017.

Professor Emeritus from The College of New Rochelle, Susan is widely published in the areas of differentiated instruction, twice exceptional students, primary-aged gifted students, and social and emotional factors affecting gifted students. Her books include Creativity 1,2,3; Chi Square, Pie Charts and Me; To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strategies for Helping Bright Students with LD, ADHD, and More; Multiple Intelligences in the Elementary Classroom: A Teachers Toolkit; and Staying In Stepp: Nurturing the Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted Adolescents.

Susan served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Students and is the past president and founder of the Association for the Education of Gifted Underachieving Students (AEGUS). Susan serves on the advisory boards of 2e Newsletter and Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities.

This past year, Susan Baum and Robin Schader published the 3rd edition of To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strength-Based Strategies for Helping Twice-Exceptional Students with LD, ADHD, and More (Prufrock Press), as well as a Chapter titled Using a Positive Lens: Engaging Twice-Exceptional Learners in the book edited by Scott Barry Kaufmann,Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Oxford Press).

Robin Schader received her Ph.D. in Gifted and Talented Education from the University of Connecticut, where she was an Assistant Research Professor. Her work and research focus on talent development, particularly with respect to the role of parents. Dr. Schader served as Parent Resource Specialist for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) for ten years. She has been invited to speak at numerous state and national conferences including NAGC, National PTA, and National HeadStart. Before graduate school, she founded and directed Music House, a non-profit “home away from home” for exceptionally talented pre-college music students from around the world who needed to live near the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.

She has served on the boards of several public and private institutions, including the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, the Neag School of Education Advisory Board, the Berkshire Hills Music Academy, the Butte Valley, California, Public School Board, and Apple Computer’s National Dealer Advisory Board (she owned and operated an independent Apple dealership for 15 years prior to graduate school). Currently Robin is a trustee of Bridges Academy, a school for twice-exceptional students, as well as on the executive board of the 2e Center for Research and Professional Development.

This past year, Susan Baum and Robin Schader published the 3rd edition of To Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strength-Based Strategies for Helping Twice-Exceptional Students with LD, ADHD, and More (Prufrock Press), as well as a Chapter titled Using a Positive Lens: Engaging Twice-Exceptional Learners in the book edited by Scott Barry Kaufmann,Twice Exceptional: Supporting and Educating Bright and Creative Students with Learning Difficulties (Oxford Press).

Dan Peters, Ph.D.

Make Your 2e Worrier a 2e Warrior

Gifted individuals are prone to several types of anxiety, including worrying, obsessing, perfectionism, social anxiety, and generalized anxiety. Anxious children and adolescents often engage in behaviors to minimize the distress of their anxiety, such as avoiding school or not trying if they do not think they can do a task perfectly. Children and adolescents who worry are often preoccupied with their worrisome thoughts, thus inhibiting their ability to maximally learn in the classroom, comfortably connect with peers, and fully engage in life. While the aforementioned is true for gifted children, twice-exceptional (2e) children face additional challenges given their disabilities such as ADHD, Autistic spectrum, and Dyslexia. Being aware of a twice-exceptional individual’s propensity to become anxious, as well as learning and teaching effective interventions for reducing anxiety, increases the likelihood of academic achievement, and positive social-emotional adjustment in life.

In this workshop, participants will learn: (1) The components of the brain and body responsible for the fear and relaxation response (2) the characteristics of gifted and twice-exceptional (2e) youth that make them more susceptible to anxiety (3) to identify symptoms and behaviors associated with different types of anxiety (4) the role of thinking in determining emotions and behavior (5) cognitive, behavioral, and mindfulness strategies for managing and overcoming anxiety, and (6) to develop creative anxiety reduction and management plans for children, adolescents, and even adults. We will turn 2e worriers into warriors!

Dan Peters, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist who has devoted his career to the assessment, consultation and treatment of children, adolescents, and families, specializing in learning differences, anxiety, and issues related to giftedness and twice-exceptionality. He is passionate about helping parents and teachers engage children in the classroom, at home, and in life so that they can realize their full potential. Dr. Peters is co-founder and Executive Director of the Summit Center with offices in the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles, and co-founder of Parent Footprint, an on-line interactive parent training program. He hosts the Parent Footprint Podcast with Dr. Dan, available on iTunes, Stitcher, Libsyn, and elsewhere. He is the author of Make Your Worrier a Warrior: A Guide to Conquering Your Child’s Fears, From Worrier to Warrior: A Guide to Conquering Your Fears, The Warrior Workbook (co-authored with Dr. Lisa Reid and Stephanie Davis), and Raising Creative Kids (co-authored with Dr. Susan Daniels). Dr. Peters blogs regularly for the Huffintong Post and Psychology Today and writes and speaks on topics related to parenting, learning differences, and education.

Lisa Van Gemert, M.Ed.T.

Addressing Perfectionism

Strength-based practices can and do enable 2E students to develop their gifts while simultaneously compensating for their deficits. In particular, Renzulli and Reis’ Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM), focusing on talent development, can be used to enhance strengths as well as address academic challenges often experienced by 2E students. Strategies such as developing Talent Profiles, completing Interest Inventories, and implementing a broad array of enrichment and strength-based practices, such as Enrichment Clusters, Renzulli Learning, and Types I, II, and III Enrichment, will be discussed.

Using a combination of neuropsychology, pedagogy, experience, humor, technology and sheer fun, Lisa Van Gemert shares best practices in education with audiences around the world. She is an expert consult to television shows including Lifetime’s “Child Genius,” and a writer of award-winning lesson plans, as well as numerous published articles on social psychology and pedagogy and the book, Perfectionism: A Practical Guide to Managing Never Good Enough. A former teacher, school administrator, and Youth & Education Ambassador for Mensa, she shares resources for educators and parents on her website giftedguru.com and is co-founder with Ian Byrd of the Gifted Guild, a professional community for educators of the gifted. Lisa and her husband Steve are the parents of three sons and live in Arlington, Texas.

Joseph Renzulli, Ed.D. & Sally Reis, Ph.D.

Schoolwide Enrichment & Talent Development

Do you have children who struggle with perfectionism? Perhaps you do yourself. Would like practical ideas for helping overcome it? Perfectionism is an occupational hazard of giftedness, and its effects can be truly debilitating. Learn what perfectionism looks like in gifted kids, its potentially damaging effects, and then take a deep dive into the big ideas and strategies for turning this terrible master into a compliant servant.

Dr. Joseph S. Renzulli is a Distinguished Professor of Educational Psychology and director of the Renzulli Center for Creativity, Gifted Education, and Talent Development at the University of Connecticut. His research has focused on creative and investigative learning, talent development, and organizational models for total school improvement. Although the American Psychological Association named Dr. Renzulli among the 25 most influential psychologists in the world, he lists as his proudest accomplishment the numerous innovative applications of his Schoolwide Enrichment Model in schools around the world. He considers himself to be an on-the-ground communicator who always approaches his work from the practical perspectives of teachers. In 2018 Dr. Renzulli was listed as one of the world’s top 30 International Education Professionals.

Sally M. Reis recently completed a six-year term as the Vice Provost of Academic Affairs and currently is the Letitia Neag Chair and a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor in the Neag School of Education at UConn. She was a classroom teacher and administrator in public schools before coming to UConn. She has authored and co-authored more than 250 articles, books, book chapters, monographs and technical reports, and worked generated over 50 million dollars in grants with a UConn research team. Sally has served as the President of the National Association for Gifted Children, has won many awards for her work and research, and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. She is also the co-director of Confratute, the longest running summer institute in gifted education in the world. Her specialty areas in research include underachievement of high potential students, curriculum compacting and differentiation, talented readers and the Schoolwide Enrichment Model.

Donna Y. Ford, Ph.D.

Understanding, Preventing, and Reversing Underachievement Among 2e Students

The session focuses on factors that contribute to underachievement among gifted students, with some attention to students of color. Strategies, paradigms, and theories regarding preventing and reversing underachievement are shared.

Donna Y. Ford, Ph.D., is Professor of Education and Human Development and Cornelius Vanderbilt Endowed Chair at Vanderbilt University. She is the former 2013 Harvie Branscomb Distinguished Professor and former Betts Chair of Education & Human Development. Dr. Ford currently holds a joint appointment in the Department of Special Education and Department of Teaching and Learning. Dr. Ford has been a Professor of Special Education at the Ohio State University, an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Virginia, and an Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky.

Professor Ford earned her Doctor of Philosophy degree in Urban Education (educational psychology) (1991), Masters of Education degree (counseling) (1988), and Bachelor of Arts degree in communications and Spanish (1984) from Cleveland State University.

Professor Ford conducts research primarily in gifted education and multicultural/urban education. Specifically, her work focuses on: (1) the achievement gap; (2) recruiting and retaining culturally different students in gifted education; (3) multicultural curriculum and instruction; (4) culturally competent teacher training and development; (5) African-American identity; and (6) African-American family involvement. She consults with school districts, and educational and legal organizations on such topics as gifted education under-representation and Advanced Placement, multicultural/urban education and counseling, and closing the achievement gap.

Professor Ford has written over 200 articles and book chapters; she has made over 1,000 presentations at professional conferences and organizations, and in school districts.

She is the author/co-author of several books, including Gumbo for the Soul: Liberating Memoirs and Stories to Inspire Females of Color (2017); Telling Our Stories: Culturally Different Adults Reflect on Growing Up in Single-Parent Families (2017); R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media:Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy (2017); Recruiting and Retaining Culturally Different Students in Gifted Education (2013), Reversing Underachievement Among Gifted Black Students (1996, 2010), Multicultural Gifted Education (1999, 2011), Gifted and Advanced Black Students in School: An Anthology of Critical Works (2011). In Search of the Dream: Designing Schools and Classrooms that Work for High Potential Students from Diverse Cultural backgrounds (2004), Diverse Learners with Exceptionalities: Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom (2008), and Teaching Culturally Diverse Gifted Students (2005).

Dr. Ford’s work has been recognized by various professional organizations: Research Award from the Shannon Center for Advanced Studies; the Early Career Award and the Career Award from The American Educational Research Association; Senior Scholar Award and Early Scholar Award from The National Association for Gifted Children; the Esteemed Scholarship Award from The National Association of Black Psychologists; the Outstanding Service Award from the Council for Exceptional Children-The Association for the Gifted. She is the Vanderbilt University SEC Faculty Award recipient (2013). Professor Ford is even more proud and humbled by awards received from student organizations (Black Student Alliance Distinguished Faculty Award, and Jimmie Franklin Outstanding Vanderbilt Faculty Award).

Dr. Ford is the co-founder of the Scholar Identity Institute (SII) for Black MalesTM, and creator of The Ford Female Achievement Model of Excellence (FAME). Donna is a two-time board member of the National Association for Gifted Children and has served on numerous editorial boards, such as Gifted Child Quarterly, Exceptional Children, Roeper Review, Journal of Negro Education, Gifted Child Today, and Journal of Educational Psychology. She also reviews for several journals in such disciplines and topics as urban education, the achievement gap, educational psychology, and counseling and development. Professional development includes membership in professional organizations, including the National Association for Gifted Children, Council for Exceptional Children, American Educational Research Association, National Association for Multicultural Education, American Association of Colleges and Teacher Educators, and others.

On a personal note, she is the proud mother of Khyle L. Ford and proud grandmother of Khyle Jr. (KJ) – DYF

Bobbie Gilman, M.S.

Academic Advocacy for 2e Children

Many states have interpreted current special education law to mean that twice exceptional children performing at grade level do not qualify for services in public schools. Because 2e students may compensate well enough to perform at average levels initially, resourceful advocacy is essential to ensure that subtle, but significant weaknesses are not overlooked. Otherwise, without support, the 2e student may begin to fail as the demands of education increase. Parents are usually the first to observe gifted strengths, suspect co-existing weaknesses, and recognize the need for support of both. Informed parents, educators, and clinicians can build upon this insight to advocate effectively for the 2e child. Please join Bobbie to explore essential steps: 1) ensure that the child’s dual exceptionalities are fully and properly assessed, 2) seek gifted identification and support of strengths at school, 3) request IEP or 504 Plan evaluations to put services and accommodations for weaknesses into place, 4) pursue appropriate private interventions when possible, 5) recognize when schools are not adhering to the law, and 6) guarantee that sufficient support is maintained for the 2e child to develop his or her strengths and be successful in typical schools.

Barbara (Bobbie) Jackson Gilman, M.S. is Associate Director of the non-profit Gifted Development Center in Westminster, CO, which specializes in the assessment of gifted children at all levels of giftedness, with and without disabilities, for educational planning and advocacy. She consults with parents about gifted needs, educational programming, assessment, and gifted children with apparent weaknesses, helping to guide parents’ next steps. She participates in research on the gifted and gifted assessment. Bobbie wrote the award-winning Academic Advocacy for Gifted Children: A Parent’s Complete Guide, and Challenging Highly Gifted Learners (for teachers). The new second edition of Academic Advocacy expands parent information about twice exceptionality and acquisition of services for 2e children in schools, including legal clarifications relevant to civil rights issues that arise.

Bobbie co-chairs, with Dan Peters, the National Association for Gifted Children’s assessment special interest group. The group has worked extensively to improve identification of often overlooked 2e children since IDEA 2004. Seventeen members collaborated on the 2013 “Critical Issues in the Identification of Gifted Students with Co-existing Disabilities: The Twice-Exceptional,” and created the NAGC position statement, “Ensuring Gifted Children with Disabilities Receive Appropriate Services: Call for Comprehensive Assessment.” The group researched and created position statements to optimize use of the WISC-IV and V to better identify asynchronous gifted and 2e learners. Bobbie is the 2015 recipient of SENG’s Healthcare Professional of the Year award.

The exhibitor hall

Find 2e and gifted resources in: Education, Clinicians, Enrichment, Consultants, and Associations in the included exhibitor hall.

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2 Days of 2e Conference 2018
2 Days of 2e virtual conference is for parents, educators, and clinicians, to help bring out the best and raise self-confidence in 2e learners (gifted with a learning difference).
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